Commercial interests rather than the children's best interests have been cited as the major motivation behind the adoption of African children by families abroad, according to a latest African child adoption report.

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Law Reform, community dialogue and social mobilization are key strategies to prevent and promote the abandonment of harmful practices against children I these were crucial strategies identified by the International Expert Consultation held in Addis-Abba, Ethiopia, hosted by the SRSG on Violence against Children and Plan International, and co-organized with the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, the Committee on the Rights of the Child, UNICEF, the NGO Council on Violence against Children and the African Child Policy Forum.

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As the number of African children adopted by people outside the continent reaches record levels, experts, activists, government officials and academics have called for the practice to be stemmed, warning that adoption was too often motivated by financial gain rather than the best interests of the children involved.

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The number of children from Africa being adopted by foreign nationals from other continents has risen dramatically, a report has said.

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Nyla was just two or three days old, no one really knows for sure, when she was found abandoned in the middle of a field in Rwanda. She was "black and blue," says her adoptive mother, Karen Brown. Her umbilical cord was still attached. One year later, Nyla lives in a high-rise building in Hong Kong with American parents and a four-year-old sister who is Chinese. She just started walking and has "seven-and-a-half" teeth, though she's too shy to show them.

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Child Helpline International (CHI) hosted the first meeting of its newly formed Research, Advocacy and Policy (RAP) advisory council this week, 27-29 July 2011. Policy analysts and researchers in child protection and children’s rights as well as child helpline data experts came together to discuss steps to take CHI’s data collection and use toward advocacy for concrete policy change to a higher level.

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The richest countries in Africa spend less on looking after their children than the poorest ones, a new study shows.

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The oil-rich governments of Sudan and Angola are among the worst in Africa for looking after children, while poorer Tanzania, Mozambique and Niger are the best, a study showed on Tuesday.

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In a society that relegates the disabled to second class citizenship, Connie Tinka Kekihembo, the executive director of Katalemwa Chesire Home, stands out as one of those that have dedicated their lives to making a difference in the lives of children with disabilities.

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New report finds that the African countries which invest the most in children are among the poorest on the continent. What does that say about the priorities of its leaders?

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