A five-country study by the Southern African AIDS Trust (SAT) in partnership with the Health Economics and AIDS Research Division (HEARD) at the University of KwaZulu-Natal did just that, and the picture that has emerged is more complex than many prevention programmes targeting youth have allowed for.

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There are 91,000 children living with HIV in Malawi. A shortage of resources means that many do not receive proper treatment and care.

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When a child loses a parent to HIV/AIDS, grief counselling helps with the trauma of loss, but when the child is both poor and orphaned, the chances of a fulfilling life are significantly diminished.

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New South African research shows that AIDS-affected children struggle with educational and mental health issues more than their peers, who are vulnerable for other reasons.

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KwaZulu-Natal Province remains the epicentre of South Africa’s HIV epidemic but new research reveals that nearly a third of hospitals surveyed had not started a single HIV-positive infant on antiretroviral treatment in several years.

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HIV-infected babies have had their diagnosis time cut from three months to two weeks thanks to a mobile phone-based technology.

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An initiative that encourages men to visit exclusively male clinics is gaining popularity in western Kenya and increasing male participation in prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) programmes.

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Monday, 18 October 2010 11:46

UGANDA: 11,000 Rescued From Child Labour

 

About 11,000 needy children in northern Uganda have been rescued from various forms of child labour.

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Doris Chebet has never had a say in her life; married off at 14, she has always taken orders, first from her own family, and now from her husband's.

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About 75 000 children under the age of five die in South Africa each year. This means that about 200 South African children die every day. HIV accounts for most of the deaths, and compared with countries of similar economies, South Africa is not doing well to care for its babies.

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