04 August 2016 – As part of activities to mark World Breastfeeding Week, the United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) said more than five million newborns in Nigeria are deprived of essential nutrients and antibodies that protect them from disease and death as they are not being exclusively breastfed.

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DAR ES SALAAM, 29 February 2016 – Tanzania Food and Nutrition Centre (TFNC) has said that a majority of health practitioners lack awareness on the importance and methods of breastfeeding.

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31 July 2015 - Breastfeeding has both short-term and long-term nutritional benefits for children. Nutrition is central to sustainable development. Good nutrition in the first 1000 days of a child's life is critical for child growth, well being and survival, and future productivity.

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Tuesday, 16 October 2012 08:08

SIERRA LEONE: No sex, we are breastfeeding

 

16 October 2012 - Dandling her malnourished baby at a clinic in a Freetown slum, a Sierra Leonean mother says she has never heard of exclusive breastfeeding, but observes `banfa’ - a traditional practice where women abstain from sex as long as they are breastfeeding because they believe that sex during that period endangers the child’s health.

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1st August 2012 - The Tanzania Food and Nutrition Centre (TFNC) has called on mothers to stick to the six months exclusive breastfeeding as mother's milk provides enough diet for a newborn without substitute of any sort.

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Monday, 12 September 2011 11:43

NIGERIA: Breastfeeding and Child Well-Being

 

The fact that the World Health Organisation (WHO) sets apart August 1 to 7 every year as World Breastfeeding Week is indication that breastfeeding is, indeed, an unmatched way of providing ideal food for the healthy growth and development of infants as well as an integral part of the reproductive process with important implications for the health of mothers.

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South Africa’s high child mortality rates have forced the government to rethink its policy on infant feeding and move to discontinue the free provision of formula milk at hospitals and clinics, as well as promote an exclusive breastfeeding strategy for all mothers, including those living with HIV.

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